Official Global Travel Advisories

Mandatory COVID-19 testing

To be allowed to board a flight to Canada, all air passengers 5 years of age or older, including Canadians, are required to show a negative COVID-19 molecular test result taken within 72 hours of their scheduled time of departure to Canada. If the traveller has a connecting flight to Canada, the pre-departure test must be conducted within 72 hours of the last direct flight to Canada. This means they may need to schedule a COVID-19 test at their transit city within 72 hours of their direct flight to Canada.

All travellers 5 years of age or older, including Canadians, arriving to Canada by land are required to show a negative COVID-19 molecular test result taken in the United States within 72 hours prior to crossing the border into Canada.

Alternatively, travellers can present a positive COVID-19 molecular test taken between 14 and 90 days prior to departure.

More information on measures in place to enter Canada – Government of Canada

Hong Kong Register Travel insurance Destinations

Last updated: ET

Still valid: ET

Latest updates: The Health tab was updated - travel health notices (Public Health Agency of Canada)


Print format
Risk level(s)

Risk level(s)

COVID-19 – Global travel advisory

Effective date: March 13, 2020

Avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice.

This advisory overrides other risk levels on this page, with the exception of any risk levels for countries or regions where we advise to avoid all travel.

More about the Global travel advisory

Hong Kong - Exercise a high degree of caution

Exercise a high degree of caution in Hong Kong due to the risks of arbitrary enforcement of local laws and civil unrest.

Safety and security

Safety and security

COVID-19 - Preventative measures and restrictions

The Hong Kong Special Administration Region raised its response level from “serious” to “emergency” – the highest level.

Preventative measures and restrictions are in place. You must wear a face covering in public spaces. Follow the instructions of local authorities, including those related to physical distancing.

You may be quarantined based on your health condition, previous location or contact with others.

Latest information – Government of Hong Kong

Crime

Petty crime such as pickpocketing and purse snatching occurs, particularly:

  • at the airport
  • on public transportation
  • in main tourist shopping areas and hotel lobbies
  • on crowded streets

Bags left unattended are likely to be stolen. Ensure that your personal belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times.

Shenzhen

Robberies, some targeting foreigners, have occurred in the shopping and entertainment districts in Shenzhen Special Economic Zone, located across the border from Hong Kong in Guangdong, China.

Be extremely vigilant while in Shenzhen, and travel with a friend or in a group. Carry copies of passports and other identification and a small supply of cash separate from your other personal belongings.

Spiked food and drinks

Foreigners have been targeted in incidents of drink spiking, which is often combined with theft or credit card fraud.

Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances. These items may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Demonstrations

Large demonstrations took place regularly throughout Hong Kong in 2019. Although less frequent, unauthorized and spontaneous demonstrations could still occur.

Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent and can lead to clashes between security forces and protestors. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

More about mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Road safety

Traffic is congested in urban areas. Roads are narrow and frequently unmarked.

Public transportation

Taxi drivers speak little or no English. Have your destination written in Chinese to present to the driver. 

Air travel

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

General information about foreign domestic airlines

Entry/exit requirements

Entry/exit requirements

COVID-19 - Entry and transit requirements

Hong Kong has implemented special entry requirements for its territory. We have obtained the information below from Hong Kong authorities. This information may change at any time. It is your responsibility to verify this information with the appropriate foreign diplomatic office and to ask if you will be allowed entry, based on your individual circumstances and itinerary.

The information provided is based on travel from Canada. Keep in mind that your transit points could affect your ability to enter the country.

Travellers arriving from Canada aren’t allowed entry to Hong Kong. However, in limited circumstances, some travellers may be allowed to enter Hong Kong if they meet specific criteria.

PCR tests:

You must present upon arrival a negative PCR test result taken less than 72 hours before your flight departure, and issued by an ISO15189 certified healthcare institution.

Quarantine:

If you are allowed to enter Hong Kong, you must self-isolate for 21 days upon arrival and provide your accommodations details to local authorities. You must also present a proof of accommodation, from a Designated Quarantine hotel, in order to board your plane to Hong Kong and upon arrival.

List of designated hotels for Quarantine in Hong Kong - Government of Hong Kong

Local authorities may impose additional requirements without notice and your travel plans could be severely disrupted. You should not depend on the Government of Canada for assistance related to changes to your travel plans.

Monitor the media for the latest information.

Useful links:

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Chinese authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the Foreign Representatives in Canada.

Hong Kong is a special administrative region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China.

Passport

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for at least 1 month beyond the expiry date of your visa.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest diplomatic mission for your destination.

Useful links

Visas

Tourist visa: Not required for stays of up to 90 days
Business visa: Not required for stays of up to 90 days
Student visa: Required

Canadians travelling to mainland China via Hong Kong must obtain a Chinese visa before arrival.

Canadian travellers who are not Hong Kong residents should seek information from the nearest Chinese embassy or consulate and apply for entry visas before leaving Canada.

Canadians who reside in Hong Kong are encouraged to seek detailed information from the Office of the Commissioner of China’s foreign ministry in Hong Kong.

If entering and leaving Hong Kong via mainland China, make sure you have a visa for re-entry into China.

More about entering/exiting China

Temperature screening

All travellers are subject to body temperature screening upon entry into Hong Kong.

Screening of digital devices

Increased screening of travellers’ digital devices has been reported at border crossings between Hong Kong and mainland China.

Departure fees

An airport departure tax of HKD120 and a ferry embarkation tax of HKD19 are normally included in the price of a plane ticket to or from Hong Kong. Confirm these taxes are included with your air carrier.

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Children and travel

Learn about travel with children.

Health

Health

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.
Vaccines

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines, as per your province or territory, are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Some of these vaccines include: measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Vaccines to Consider

You may be at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases while travelling in this country. Talk to your travel health professional about which ones are right for you.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a disease of the liver spread through contaminated food and water or contact with an infected person. All those travelling to regions with a risk of hepatitis A infection should get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenza occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Get the flu shot.

Japanese encephalitis

Japanese encephalitis is a viral infection that can cause swelling of the brain. It is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Risk is low for most travellers. Vaccination should be considered for those who may be exposed to mosquito bites (e.g., spending a large amount of time outdoors) while travelling in regions with risk of Japanese encephalitis.

Measles

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

Yellow Fever - Country Entry Requirements

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

Risk

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.

About Yellow Fever
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada
* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

Food/Water

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers' diarrhea from consuming contaminated water or food.

In some areas in East Asia, food and water can also carry diseases like cholera, hepatitis A, schistosomiasis and typhoid. Practise safe food and water precautions while travelling in East Asia. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Typhoid

Typhoid is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among children, travellers going to rural areas, travellers visiting friends and relatives or those travelling for a long period of time.

Travellers visiting regions with a risk typhoid, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.


Insects

Insects and Illness

In some areas in Eastern Asia, certain insects carry and spread diseases like chikungunya, crimean congo haemorrhagic feverdengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, Lyme disease, malaria, and tick-borne encephalitis.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bites.

Chikungunya

There is currently a risk of chikungunya in this country. Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever is a viral disease that typically causes fever, bleeding under the skin, and pain. Risk is generally low for most travellers. It is spread to humans though contact with infected animal blood or bodily fluids, or from a tick bite. Protect yourself from tick bites and avoid animals. There is no vaccine available for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

Dengue
  • In this country, dengue fever may occur sporadically. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue fever can cause severe flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to dengue haemorrhagic fever, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue fever changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. After a decline in reported dengue cases worldwide in 2017 and 2018, numbers have been steeply rising again.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue fever.

Malaria

Malaria

  • There is a risk of malaria in certain areas and/or during a certain time of year in this country.
  • Malaria is a serious and occasionally fatal disease that is spread by mosquitoes. There is no vaccine against malaria.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. This includes covering up, using insect repellent and staying in well-screened, air-conditioned accommodations. You may also consider sleeping under an insecticide-treated bed net or pre-treating travel gear with insecticides.
  • Antimalarial medication may be recommended depending on your itinerary and the time of year you are travelling. See a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic, preferably six weeks before you travel to discuss your options.

Animals

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats. Some infections found in some areas in Eastern Asia, like avian influenza and rabies, can be shared between humans and animals.


Person-to-Person

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your hands often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the flu and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

Hand, foot and mouth disease

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a common viral illness that mainly affects infants and children.  Travellers are at increased risk if visiting or living in overcrowded conditions.  There is no vaccine or medication that protects against this disease.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care professional.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.


Medical services and facilities

COVID-19 - Testing facilities

Consult the following links to find out where you can get a COVID-19 test:

Good medical care is widely available. Private hospitals may require confirmation of insurance coverage, guarantee of payment or an up-front deposit before admitting patients.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kit, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

Laws and culture

Laws & culture

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad.

National security legislation

National security legislation for Hong Kong came into effect on June 30, 2020. Activities considered as national security violations are broadly and vaguely defined. They could include activities that are not considered illegal in Canada and that occurred outside of Hong Kong. You risk being arbitrarily detained on national security grounds, even while you are transiting through Hong Kong. You could be subject to transfer to mainland China for prosecution. Penalties are severe and include life imprisonment.

Illegal drugs

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and fines.

Illegal or restricted activities

Hong Kong has strict laws regarding weapons and items that may be used as weapons. You are liable for prosecution when transiting through Hong Kong International Airport with items such as knuckledusters, extendable batons, live ammunition or stunning devices in your carry-on or checked bags.

Taking photographs of military installations is strongly discouraged. Cameras may be confiscated.

Dual citizenship

The Nationality Law of the People's Republic of China applies in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). Under this law, dual citizenship is not legally recognized in Hong Kong.

If local authorities consider you a citizen of China, they may refuse to grant you access to Canadian consular services. This will prevent us from providing you with those services.

If you are a Canadian dual citizen born in Hong Kong or with current or previous Hong Kong residency, you need to complete a declaration of nationality in order to be treated as a Canadian citizen. Consult the Hong Kong Immigration Department regarding this process.

Driving

Traffic drives on the left.

Drivers involved in an accident are tested for alcohol consumption and may face prosecution if they exceed the legal limit (0.05% blood alcohol level).

The use of a cellular phone while driving is strictly prohibited unless the phone is fitted with a hands-free device.

You should carry an international driving permit.

More about the International Driving Permit

Money

The currency is the Hong Kong dollar (HKD).

Credit cards are widely accepted. ATMs are widely available.

Natural disasters and climate

Natural disasters & climate

Typhoons and monsoon

The rainy (or monsoon) season extends from May to October. Typhoons usually occur between April and October. Local authorities are very effective at disseminating information about upcoming storms to the public, in order to reduce the risks to both citizens and tourists. Severe rainstorms have occasionally caused flooding and landslides, resulting in loss of life and damage to infrastructure. Keep informed of regional weather forecasts and follow the advice of local authorities.

Assistance

Assistance

Local services

Emergency services

Dial 999 for emergency assistance.

 Consular assistance

To reduce the spread of COVID-19, the Consulate General of Canada in Hong Kong is limiting in-person services. A limited number of in-person appointments are available when booked online in advance.

Send your passport and citizenship applications by mail or deliver them to the drop-off box located at the entrance of the Consulate General. Consular staff will contact you by telephone or email to confirm receipt of your application and for any required follow-up.

If you need another type of consular assistance, contact the Consulate General by email or telephone.

Hong Kong - Consulate General of Canada
Street Address9th Floor, 25 Westlands Road, Quarry Bay, Hong Kong SAR, ChinaPostal Address8th Floor, 25 Westlands Road, Quarry Bay, Hong Kong SAR, ChinaTelephone85 (2) 3719 4700Fax85 (2) 2847 7561Emailhkong-cs@international.gc.caInternetwww.hongkong.gc.caServicesPassport Services AvailableFacebookConsulate General of Canada in Hong Kong & MacaoTwitter@CanCGHongKong

For emergency consular assistance, call the Consulate General of Canada in Hong Kong and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.


The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services.

Date modified: