Benin

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Risk level(s)

Risk level(s)

Benin - Exercise a high degree of caution

Exercise a high degree of caution in Benin due to crime.

W National Park - Avoid all travel

Avoid all travel to to W National Park due to the regional threat of terrorism.

Safety and security situation

Safety and security

Safety and security

The security situation is generally stable. You should be vigilant at all times, however, and avoid demonstrations, large crowds and public areas where unrest may occur.

Northeast Benin

Be particularly vigilant in regions bordering Nigeria (specifically, the northern portion of the Benin–Nigeria border) because of potential incursions by Nigerian militants.

Crime

Petty crimes, such as purse snatching and pickpocketing, occur.

Robberies and muggings are a significant problem in Cotonou near the port, near railways and along the beaches near hotels frequented by international visitors.

Armed robbery, especially at night, has increased in Cotonou and is common in the area bordering Nigeria.

Carjackings are on the rise throughout the country.

Avoid driving and walking after nightfall.

Do not show signs of affluence, and ensure that your personal belongings and travel documents are secure, particularly in the Dantokpa market.

Terrorism

There is a threat of terrorism. Benin’s involvement in a regional military offensive against Boko Haram makes it a potential target for terrorist attacks.

Attacks may occur at any time.

Targets could include:

  • government buildings, including schools
  • places of worship
  • airports and other transportation hubs and networks
  • public areas such as tourist attractions, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, shopping centres, markets, hotels and other sites frequented by foreigners

Always be aware of your surroundings when in public places.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations may occur. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

More about mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Piracy

Pirate attacks and armed robbery against ships occur in coastal waters. Mariners should take appropriate precautions.

Live piracy report - International Maritime Bureau’s Piracy Reporting Centre

Fraud

Credit card and ATM fraud occurs. Be cautious when using debit or credit cards:

  • pay careful attention when your cards are being handled by others
  • use ATMs located in well-lit public areas or inside a bank or business
  • avoid using card readers with an irregular or unusual feature
  • cover the keypad with one hand when entering your PIN
  • check for any unauthorized transactions on your account statements

More about overseas fraud

Road safety

Road conditions range from fair to poor.

Watch for vehicles changing lanes without warning because of broken-down vehicles and potholes in their path.

There are paved roads in Cotonou and along the coast, and one leading north to Niger. Other roads are made of hard-packed sand and may become impassable during the rainy seasons.

Poor driving habits, inadequate street lighting, motorcycle traffic and overloaded trucks pose additional hazards.

Avoid overland travel after dark, particularly on the coastal highway, in the border regions with Nigeria and Nigeria, and on the road linking Cotonou and Parakou.

In case of an accident resulting in injury, take the individual directly to the hospital. If witnesses are hostile, go immediately to the nearest police station.

Fuel shortages are frequent in the rural areas of northern Benin.

Public transportation

Public transportation in Cotonou, including moped taxis, is not reliable.

Buses can be used for travel within Benin.

Air travel

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

General information about foreign domestic airlines

General safety recommendations

Cotonou is the main port and the largest city in Benin. Tourist facilities are available there but are limited elsewhere in the country.

Exercise caution and avoid visiting beaches alone. Ocean currents are very strong along the coast. Many people drown each year.

Entry/exit requirements

Entry/exit requirements

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Beninese authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with foreign diplomatic missions and consulates in Canada.

Passport

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the date you expect to leave Benin.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest diplomatic mission for your destination.

Useful links

Visas

Canadians must be in possession of a visa prior to arriving in Benin.

Tourist visa: Required
Business visa: Required
Student visa: Required

Children and travel

Learn about travel with children.

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Health

Health

Related Travel Health Notices
Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.
Vaccines

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines, as per your province or territory, are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Some of these vaccines include: measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Vaccines to Consider

You may be at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases while travelling in this country. Talk to your travel health professional about which ones are right for you.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a disease of the liver spread through contaminated food and water or contact with an infected person. All those travelling to regions with a risk of hepatitis A infection should get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenza occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Get the flu shot.

Measles

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease and is common in most parts of the world.

Be sure your measles vaccination is up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Meningococcal disease

This country is in the African Meningitis Belt, an area where there are many cases of meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is a serious and sometimes fatal infection. Travellers who may be at high risk should consider getting vaccinated. High-risk travellers include those living or working with the local population (e.g., health care workers) or those travelling to crowded areas or taking part in large gatherings.

Polio

There is a risk of polio in this country. 

Recommendations:

  • Be sure that your vaccination against polio is up to date. Polio is part of the routine vaccine schedule for children in Canada.
  • One booster dose of the polio vaccine is recommended as an adult. 
Rabies

Rabies is a deadly illness spread to humans through a bite, scratch or lick from an infected animal. Vaccination should be considered for travellers going to areas where rabies exists and who have a high risk of exposure (i.e., close contact with animals, occupational risk, and children).

Yellow Fever - Country Entry Requirements

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

Risk

  • There is a risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is required if you are coming from or have transited through an airport of a country where yellow fever occurs. 

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is recommended.
  • There is currently a shortage of the yellow fever vaccine in Canada. It is important for travellers to contact a designated Yellow Fever Vaccination Centre well in advance of their trip to ensure that the vaccine is available.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care professional.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites.
     

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

Food/Water

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers' diarrhea from consuming contaminated water or food.

In some areas in West Africa, food and water can also carry diseases like cholera, hepatitis A, schistosomiasis and typhoid. Practise safe food and water precautions while travelling in West Africa. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Cholera

Risk

Cholera is a risk in parts of this country.  Most travellers are at very low risk.

For protection of cholera

All travellers should practise safe food and water precautions.

Cholera vaccination

Travellers at higher risk should discuss with a health care professional the benefits of getting vaccinated.

Travellers at higher risk include those:

  • visiting, working or living in areas with limited access to safe food, water and proper sanitation
  • visiting areas where outbreaks are occurring.

 

Schistosomiasis

Schistosomiasis can be spread to humans through freshwater sources contaminated by blood flukes (tiny worms). The eggs of the worms can cause stomach illnesses like diarrhea and cramps or urinary problems. Risk is generally low for most travellers. Avoid swimming in freshwater sources (lakes, rivers, ponds). There is no vaccine available for schistosomiasis.

Travellers' diarrhea
  • Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.
  • Risk of developing travellers' diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.
  • The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.
Typhoid

Typhoid is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among pediatric travellers, travellers going to rural areas, visiting friends and relatives or travelling for a long period of time. Travellers visiting regions with typhoid risk, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.


Insects

Insects and Illness

In some areas in West Africa, certain insects carry and spread diseases like African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, malaria, onchocerciasis, Rift Valley feverWest Nile virusyellow fever and Zika virus.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bites.

Chikungunya

There is currently a risk of chikungunya in this country. Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

Zika virus infection

Zika virus infection is a risk in this country. The mosquito that spreads the virus is found here.  

Travel recommendations:

All travellers should protect themselves from mosquito bites and other diseases spread by insects.   


Malaria

Malaria

  • There is a risk of malaria throughout the year in the whole country.
  • Malaria is a serious and occasionally fatal disease that is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. There is no vaccine against malaria.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. This includes covering up, using insect repellent and staying in enclosed air-conditioned accommodations. You may also consider pre-treating clothing and travel gear with insecticides and sleeping under an insecticide-treated bednet.
  • See a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic, preferably six weeks before you travel to discuss the benefits of taking antimalarial medication and to determine which one to take.

Animals

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats. Certain infections found in some areas in West Africa, like avian influenza, ebola, and rabies, can be shared between humans and animals.


Person-to-Person

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your hands often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the flu and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

HIV

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks and impairs the immune system, resulting in a chronic, progressive illness known as AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). 

High risk activities include anything which puts you in contact with blood or body fluids, such as unprotected sex and exposure to unsterilized needles for medications or other substances (for example, steroids and drugs), tattooing, body-piercing or acupuncture.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care professional.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.


Medical services and facilities

Medical facilities are adequate in Cotonou but supplies of medicine are limited throughout the country.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kit, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

Laws and culture

Laws & culture

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad.

Laws and illegal activities

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are strict, and convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines. If you are travelling with prescription medicine, carry proof of your prescription.

Sexual relations with minors under 21 years of age are illegal and severely punished by law.

Do not take pictures of military zones, airports or government offices. You should ask permission before taking any picture.

LGBTQ2 travellers

Although the laws of Benin law does not prohibit sexual acts between individuals of the same sex. However, homosexuality is not widely accepted in Benin. Homosexual behaviour could lead to arrest under laws such as indecent exposure.

General safety information and advice for LGBTQ2 travellers abroad

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Benin.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Benin, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements.

General information for travellers with dual citizenship

Driving

An International Driving Permit is required.

Culture

Exercise common sense and discretion in dress and behaviour. You should respect religious and social traditions to avoid offending local sensitivities.

Money

The currency is the West African Financial Community franc, or CFA franc (XOF).

Natural disasters and climate

Natural disasters & climate

In the south, there are two rainy seasons: from April to mid-July and mid-September to October. In the north, the rainy season extends from June to September.

Unpaved roads can become impassable during the rainy seasons.

The harmattan, a burning, dusty and sand-filled wind, blows in from the desert from December to March. Keep informed of local weather forecasts and plan your activities accordingly.

Assistance

Assistance

Local services

Emergency services

In case of emergency, dial:

  • police: 117
  • medical assistance: +229 21 30 17 69 or +229 21 30 06 56
  • firefighters: 118

Consular assistance

Canada has no diplomatic or consular presence in Benin. The Embassy of Canada to Burkina Faso in Ouagadougou is responsible for Canadian interests in Benin.

Cotonou - Consulate of Canada
Street AddressHaie Vive, behind Tri-postal and Cotonou airport, BeninPostal AddressP.O. Box 1124, Tri-postal 04 (Cadjehoun), Cotonou, BeninTelephone+229 21 30 21 45 / +229 95 95 11 80Emailjhounton@yahoo.frOffice hoursMonday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Ouagadougou - Embassy of Canada
Street Address316 Professeur Ki-Zerbo Street, Ouagadougou, Burkina FasoPostal AddressP.O. Box 548, Ouagadougou, 01, Kadiogo Province, Burkina FasoTelephone+226 25 49 08 00 / +226 25 31 18 94Fax+226 25 49 08 10 / +226 25 31 19 00Emailouaga@international.gc.caInternetwww.burkinafaso.gc.caServicesPassport Services Available

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada to Burkina Faso in Ouagadougou and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.


The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services.

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