International Travel and COVID-19

Before travelling:

If you have not completed a COVID-19 vaccine series, you should continue to avoid non-essential travel to all destinations.

Useful links

Australia Travel Advice

Last updated: ET

Latest updates: The Health section was updated - travel health information (Public Health Agency of Canada)

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Risk level

Australia - Take normal security precautions

Take normal security precautions in Australia.

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Safety and security

COVID-19 - Preventative measures and restrictions

COVID-19 preventative measures and restrictions are still in effect in some destinations.

These could include:

  • curfews, movement restrictions, or lockdowns
  • mandatory mask use
  • required proof of vaccination or a COVID-19 test result to access public and private services and spaces

Before travelling, verify if specific restrictions or requirements are still in effect.

Foreign Representatives in Canada

Crime

Violent crime is low.

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and bag snatching, occurs mostly in larger cities. Vehicle break-ins are common.

Robberies of safe-deposit facilities are common at inexpensive hotels and hostels.

  • Ensure that your personal belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times
  • Never leave personal belongings, such as money, credit cards, cell phones and other electronics, unattended
  • Exercise caution in popular tourist areas

Online scam

Scammers have duped tourists into transferring money to an overseas bank account in exchange for renting accommodation in Australia.

When renting accommodation, beware of online scams.

More about overseas fraud

Demonstrations

Demonstrations may occur. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

More about mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Terrorism

There is a threat of terrorism. The Government of Australia maintains a national terrorism threat advisory system. Individuals or groups have developed both the intent and capability to conduct a terrorist attack in Australia. Terrorist attacks could occur at any time.

Targets could include:

  • government buildings, including schools
  • places of worship
  • airports and other transportation hubs and networks
  • public areas such as tourist attractions, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, shopping centres, markets, hotels and other sites frequented by foreigners

Always be aware of your surroundings when in public places.

Australian National Security – Government of Australia

Spiked food and drinks

Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances, as they may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Water activities

Swimming

Coastal waters can be dangerous. Riptides are common and can be dangerous. Several drownings occur each year.

In certain areas, sharks, crocodiles, jellyfish and other wildlife pose a risk to swimmers.

  • Avoid unsupervised beaches
  • Follow the instructions and warnings of lifeguards
  • Respect the flag warning system, which provides notice of water conditions and safety risks on beaches

Beach safety – Government of Australia

Diving and snorkelling

You must provide a medical declaration for diving or snorkelling.

Follow the instructions and warnings of local authorities.

Safety information for divers and snorkellers – Government of Australia

Trekking and mountaineering

Weather conditions may be dry during the summer. You should be prepared for hot weather.

If you intend on trekking or mountaineering:

  • never do so alone and always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation
  • ensure that your physical condition is good enough to meet the challenges of your activity
  • ensure that you’re properly equipped and well informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary, including when you expect to be back to camp
  • obtain detailed information on trekking routes before setting out and do not venture off marked trails or slopes

Remote areas

Some regions in Australia’s interior are very isolated and have small populations. Services are scarce.

You may have difficulty getting adequate mobile phone coverage if you travel there by car.

  • Avoid travelling alone
  • Inform relatives of your itinerary

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety are very good throughout the country. Exercise caution when driving in rural areas at night. Drivers often drive at excessive speeds. Roaming animals and road trains pose further hazards.

Access to some remote locations may be impossible during severe weather conditions. Due to the great distances between settlements and the isolation of many outback areas:

  • avoid travelling in extreme heat conditions
  • plan your overland route carefully
  • provide a friend or relative with your itinerary, and ensure that your vehicle is in good repair
  • carry a first-aid kit and personal medication
  • carry sufficient fuel, water, and food supplies
  • bring a satellite phone or an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB)

Air travel

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

General information about foreign domestic airlines

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Entry and exit requirements

COVID-19 - Entry, exit and transit restrictions and requirements

Most governments have implemented special entry and exit restrictions and requirements for their territory due to COVID-19. These measures can be imposed suddenly and may include:

  • entry or exit bans
  • quarantine
  • mandatory proof of vaccination or COVID-19 testing
  • suspensions or reductions of international transportation options

Foreign authorities might not recognize or accept proof of vaccination issued by Canadian provinces and territories. You may need to obtain a translation, a notarization, an authentication, or the legalization of the document.

Before travelling:

  • verify if the local authorities of both your current location and destinations have implemented any restrictions or requirements related to this situation
  • consider even your transit points, as there are transit rules in place in many destinations
  • monitor the media for the latest information
  • reconfirm the requirements with your airline or tour operator

The situation could disrupt your travel plans. You should not depend on the Government of Canada for assistance to change your travel plans.

Useful links

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Australian authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the Foreign Representatives in Canada.

Passport

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid on the day of entry into the country.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Useful links

Visas

Tourist visa: required
Business visa: required
Student visa: required

Canadians must also be in possession of an electronic travel authority (ETA) to visit Australia. Ensure that you travel with the same passport used to apply for your ETA.

A health examination might be necessary to obtain certain visas.

Children and travel

Learn about travel with children.

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

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Health

Relevant Travel Health Notices

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.

Outbreak Monitoring

Japanese encephalitis in Australia

A higher than expected number of Japanese encephalitis cases has been reported in several Australian states. Some of the cases have been reported in areas of Australia where Japanese encephalitis has not previously been detected..

 

Japanese encephalitis is a viral infection that, in rare cases, can cause swelling of the brain. It is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Most travellers are at low risk of developing Japanese encephalitis disease.

 

It is important to always protect yourself from mosquito bites, especially from sunset to sunrise.

 

Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel. Your health care provider may discuss the benefits of getting vaccinated for Japanese encephalitis if you are at a higher risk of exposure (e.g., spending a large amount of time outdoors).

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines, as per your province or territory, are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Some of these vaccines include: measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines are right for you.

Yellow Fever - Country Entry Requirements

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

Risk

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is required if you are coming from or have transited through an airport of a country where yellow fever occurs.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care professional.
  • Contact a designated Yellow Fever Vaccination Centre well in advance of your trip to arrange for vaccination.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada
* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenza occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Get the flu shot.

COVID-19

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

For destination entry and exit requirements, including for COVID-19 vaccination requirements, please check the Entry/exit requirements section.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

Measles

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air..

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

Japanese encephalitis

Japanese encephalitis is a viral infection that can cause swelling of the brain. It is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Risk is low for most travellers. Vaccination should be considered for those who may be exposed to mosquito bites (e.g., spending a large amount of time outdoors) while travelling in regions with risk of Japanese encephalitis.

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers' diarrhea from consuming contaminated water or food.

Practise safe food and water precautions while travelling in Australia and New Zealand. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Insects and Illness

In some areas in Australia and New Zealand, certain insects carry and spread diseases like dengue fever, Japanese encephalitisWest Nile virus and Zika Virus.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bites.

Dengue
  • In this country, risk of dengue is sporadic. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue fever.

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats. Certain infections found in some areas in Australia and New Zealand, like rabies, can be shared between humans and animals.

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your hands often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the flu and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

Medical services and facilities

COVID-19 - Testing facilities

Consult the following links to find out where you can get a COVID-19 test:

Local COVID-19 services - Government of Australia

Health care is excellent. Service is available throughout the country.

Payment is expected at time of service.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kit, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

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Laws and culture

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad.

Canada and Australia are signatories to the Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons. This enables a Canadian imprisoned in Australia to request a transfer to a Canadian prison to complete a sentence. The transfer requires the agreement of both Canadian and Australian authorities. This process can take a long time and there is no guarantee that the transfer will be approved by either or both sides.

Drugs

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect lengthy jail sentences and heavy fines.

Imports and exports

There are very strict rules and quarantine measures regarding the importation of food and animal products. Information about items which you can and cannot bring to Australia is available from Australia’s Department of Home Affairs.

Immigration and Citizenship – Government of Australia

Driving

Traffic drives on the left.

Local authorities accept your overseas driving licence if the names on your licence match exactly those in your passport.

You must apply for a local licence if you intend to stay in Australia longer than 3 months.

Permits are required when travelling on Aboriginal territory.

You should carry an international driving permit.

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Australia.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Australia, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements.

General information for travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Australia.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Australia, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Australian court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Australia to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

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Money

The currency of Australia is the Australian dollar (AUD).

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Natural disasters and climate

Bush and forest fires

Bush and forest fires are common between October and April, particularly in areas covered by bushes, long grass or coastal scrub. Elevated fire danger ratings and alert levels may be applied to affected areas. The air quality in areas near active fires may deteriorate due to heavy smoke.

In case of a major fire:

  • stay away from the affected area, particularly if you suffer from respiratory ailments
  • be prepared to modify your travel arrangements or even evacuate the area on short notice
  • follow the instructions of local emergency services personnel
  • monitor local media for up-to-date information on the situation

For current information, consult the relevant state or territory authorities.

Fire services

Rainy season

The rainy season extends from November to April. Severe flooding occurs annually, especially in the inland parts of the following states: 

  • New South Wales
  • Queensland
  • Western Australia

Seasonal flooding can hamper overland travel and reduce the provision of essential services. Roads may become impassable and bridges damaged. 

  • Monitor local news and weather reports
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities, including evacuation orders

Australia Rainfall and river conditions – Bureau of meteorology, Australian government

Cyclones

Cyclones usually occur from November to April. They may occur along the coastal areas of Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.

During this period, even small storms can quickly develop into major cyclones. These severe storms can put you at risk and hamper the provision of essential services.

If you decide to travel to Australia during the cyclone season:

  • know that you expose yourself to serious safety risks
  • be prepared to change your travel plans on short notice, including cutting short or cancelling your trip
  • stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • carry emergency contact information for your airline or tour operator
  • follow the advice and instructions of local authorities

Useful links

Seismic activity

Australia is located in a seismic zone. Earthquakes may occur.

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Need help?

Local services

Emergency services

Dial 000 for emergency assistance.

Consular assistance

Due to the ongoing pandemic, our consular services could be limited. Contact us by email or telephone before visiting our offices.

Canberra - High Commission of Canada
Street AddressCommonwealth Avenue, Canberra ACT, Australia 2600Telephone(61) 2 6270 4000Fax(61) 2 6270 4060Emailcnbra@international.gc.caInternethttps://www.Canada.ca/Canada-And-AustraliaServicesPassport Services AvailableFacebookCanada Down UnderTwitter@canadadownunderOther social mediaCanada Down Under
Consular district

Australian Capital Territory, Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania,

Guam, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Caledonia, Northern Marianas, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu

Sydney - Consulate General of Canada
Street AddressLevel 6, Quay West Building, 111 Harrington Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, AustraliaTelephone61 (2) 9364-3000Fax61 (2) 9364-3098Emailsydny-cs@international.gc.caInternethttps://www.Canada.ca/Canada-And-AustraliaServicesPassport Services AvailableFacebookCanada Down UnderTwitter@canadadownunderOther social mediaCanada Down Under

For emergency consular assistance, call the High Commission of Canada in Australia, in Canberra, or the Consulate General of Canada in Sydney and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

Disclaimer

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services.

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