Sweden

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Advisories

Advisories

Sweden - Exercise normal security precautions

There is no nationwide advisory in effect for Sweden. Exercise normal security precautions.

Security

Security

Crime

The crime rate is lower in Sweden than in most European countries. Petty crime (such as pickpocketing and purse snatching) occurs in areas frequented by tourists, such as Stockholm’s Old Town and the Central Station, in restaurants and on public transportation, particularly in urban areas during the summer months. Pickpockets and purse snatchers may work in teams; one distracts the victim and another commits the robbery. Hotel lobbies and breakfast rooms attract professional, well-dressed thieves. Remain vigilant and ensure your valuables are secure at all times.

Since 2014, there has been an increase in gang and organized crime-related violence in southern Sweden, including in the cities of Gothenburg and Malmö. In Malmö, several car bombs were reported at the end of 2014. Grenade attacks on property have been taking place in the city since January 2015. On March 18, 2015, an attack occurred at a restaurant in Gothenburg, killing two people. While these incidents have not occurred in areas typically frequented by tourists, you should monitor local media and follow the advice of local authorities.

Terrorism

There is a threat of terrorism in Europe. Terrorist attacks could occur at any time and could target areas frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers, such as tourist attractions, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, shopping centres, markets, hotels, schools, places of worship and airports and other transportation hubs. Exercise caution if attending sporting events, religious holiday celebrations and other public festivities. Remain vigilant at all times, monitor local media and follow the advice of local authorities.

The Government of Sweden maintains a public alert system on terrorism. The threat level for the country is at level 3 (elevated threat) on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 being the most serious). Visit the Swedish Security Service website for more information.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur periodically and, while they are normally peaceful, have the potential to suddenly turn violent. Avoid all demonstrations, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Road travel

The road network is excellent. Some roads may be closed in winter, particularly in northern areas. Consult local news and weather reports prior to travel.

Public transportation

Taxis are available. Public transportation is convenient, reliable and punctual. Modern trains operate throughout the country. Extensive and efficient ferry services operate between Sweden and other countries in the Baltic Sea.

Air travel

The Government of Canada does not assess foreign domestic airlines’ compliance with international aviation safety standards. See Foreign domestic airlines for more information.

General safety information

Exercise normal safety precautions. Ensure that your personal belongings, including passports and other travel documents are secure at all times.

There has been a significant increase in the number of migrants and refugees entering Europe. Some countries have already experienced disruptions to transportation services, including at ferry ports and railway stations, and have seen major delays at border crossings. The situation also heightens the potential for demonstrations that could turn violent without warning, particularly at railway stations and other transportation hubs. If you are travelling in the region, monitor local news and follow the advice of local authorities, and contact your transport carrier to determine whether the situation could disrupt your travel.

Entry/exit requirements

Entry/exit requirements

It is the sole prerogative of every country or territory to determine who is allowed to enter or exit. Canadian consular officials cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet entry or exit requirements. The following information has been obtained from the Swedish authorities and is subject to change at any time. The country- or territory-specific entry/exit requirements are provided on this page for information purposes only. While every effort is made to provide accurate information, information contained here is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Government of Canada assumes no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided. It is your responsibility to check with the Embassy of Sweden or one of its consulates for up-to-date information.

Passport

Sweden is a Schengen area country. Upon arrival, Canadians are required to present a passport that must be valid for at least three months beyond the date of expected departure from the Schengen area. Prior to travelling, ask your transportation company about its requirements related to passport validity, which may be more stringent than the country's entry rules.

Temporary passport holders may be subject to different entry requirements. Check with diplomatic representatives for up-to-date information.

Official (special and diplomatic) passport holders must consult the Official Travel page, as they may be subject to different entry requirements.

Temporary border controls

The Swedish government has reintroduced internal border controls at certain border crossings. Canadians may be required to pass through immigration controls when entering Sweden, even if arriving from another Schengen area country.

Visas

Tourist visa: Not required for stays up to 90 days*

Business visa: Not required

Student resident permit: Not required for stays up to 90 days

Work permit: Required

* The 90-day period begins upon initial entry into any country of the Schengen area. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any Schengen area country within any 180-day period.

Schengen area

The following 26 countries comprise the Schengen area: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

The Schengen area has common rules regarding visas and controls at external borders and has abolished checks within the area’s internal borders. However, some Schengen area countries may require that you register with local authorities shortly after your arrival, particularly when staying in private accommodations.

Canadians do not need a visa for travel to countries within the Schengen area for stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any country within the Schengen area.

It is important to get your passport stamped when you first enter the Schengen area. The absence of an entry stamp from the initial Schengen port of entry could create difficulties during subsequent encounters with local police or other authorities throughout the Schengen area or at the time of departure from the area.

If you overstay the permitted 90 days in the Schengen area, you may be fined or deported. If you plan to stay in the Schengen area for longer than the 90 days in any 180-day period, you must contact the high commission or embassy of the country or countries you are travelling to and obtain the appropriate visa prior to travel.

The European Commission’s (EC’S) Migration and Home Affairs provides additional information and a calculator of travel days remaining, taking into account previous stays in the Schengen area.

The Schengen Borders Code allows member states to temporarily reintroduce internal border controls in the event that a serious threat to public policy or internal security has been established. Canadians wishing to enter a Schengen area country that has reintroduced internal border controls could be required to present a passport, valid for at least three months from the time of expected departure from that country. For additional information, visit the EC’s Temporary Reintroduction of Border Control.

Children and travel

Children need special documentation to visit certain countries. See Children for more information.

Yellow fever

See Health to obtain information on this country’s vaccination requirements.

Health

Health

Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.
Vaccines
Food/Water
Insects
Malaria
Animals
Person-to-Person

Medical services and facilities

Excellent medical care is widely available.

Laws & culture

Laws & culture

You are subject to local laws. See Arrest and detention for more information.

Canada and Sweden are signatories to the Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons (Council of Europe). This enables a Canadian imprisoned in Sweden to request a transfer to a Canadian prison to complete a sentence. The transfer requires the agreement of both Canadian and Swedish authorities.

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Sweden. However, Canadian officials may be limited in their ability to provide you with consular services if local authorities consider you a Swedish citizen. You should always travel using your valid Canadian passport and present yourself as Canadian to foreign authorities at all times to minimize this risk. You may also need to carry and present a Swedish passport for legal reasons, for example to enter and exit the country (see Entry/exit requirements to determine passport requirements). Citizenship is determined solely by national laws, and the decision to recognize dual citizenship rests completely with the country in which you are located when seeking consular assistance. See Travelling as a dual citizen for more information.

Illegal drugs

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are strict. Convicted offenders can expect jail sentences or heavy fines.

Road travel

A Canadian driver’s licence can be used to drive in Sweden for up to one year. An International Driving Permit is recommended.

Penalties for drinking and driving are strict. The legal blood alcohol limit is 0.02 percent.

Headlights must be on at all times. The use of seat belts is mandatory. Approved child or booster seats are required for children under seven. Vehicles must be fitted with winter tires from December 1 to March 31.

A congestion tax is imposed on vehicles entering and exiting Stockholm and Göteborg on weekdays between 6:30 a.m. and 6:29 p.m. For more information, consult the Swedish Transport Agency website.

Same-sex marriages

Swedish authorities recognize same-sex marriages.

Money

The currency of Sweden is the Swedish krona (SEK).

Most credit cards (Visa, MasterCard) are widely accepted in major shops, restaurants and hotels. American Express and traveller’s cheques are not widely accepted. Automated banking machines are widely available.

When crossing one of the external border control points of the European Union (EU), you must make a declaration to customs upon entry or exit if you have at least €10,000 or the equivalent in other currencies. The sum can be in cash, cheques, money orders, traveller’s cheques or any other convertible assets. This does not apply if you are travelling within the EU or in transit to a non-EU country. For more information on the EU legislation and links to EU countries’ sites, visit the web page of the European Commission on cash controls.

Natural disasters & climate

Natural disasters & climate

Floods and windstorms occur periodically.

Assistance

Assistance

Local services

Emergency services

Dial 112 for emergency assistance.

Consular assistance

Stockholm - Embassy of Canada
Street Address23 Klarabergsgatan, Stockholm, SwedenPostal AddressP.O. Box 16129 , Stockholm, Sweden, 10323, SwedenTelephone46 (0) 8 453-3000Fax46 (0) 8 453-3016Emailstkhm-cs@international.gc.caInternetwww.sweden.gc.caServicesPassport Services AvailableTwitter@CanadaSweden
Gothenburg - Consulate of Canada
Street AddressMässans gata 18, Gothenburg, SwedenPostal AddressP.O. Box 5243, 402 24, Gothenburg, SwedenTelephone46 (0) 31 707 4288Fax46 (0) 31 154 099Emailper@jessing.nuTwitter@CanadaSweden

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada in Stockholm and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.


The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. The Government of Canada takes the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provides credible and timely information in its Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad. In the event of a large-scale emergency, every effort will be made to provide assistance. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

See Large-scale emergencies abroad for more information.

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