Azerbaijan

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Advisories

Advisories

Azerbaijan - Exercise a high degree of caution

There is no nationwide advisory in effect for Azerbaijan. However, you should exercise a high degree of caution as crime, such as pickpocketing and attacks on foreigners, occurs.

Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding areas - Avoid all travel

Global Affairs Canada advises against all travel to Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding areas due to the tense political situation. The Government of Canada does not recognize the sovereignty of Nagorno-Karabakh. You cannot enter this area from Azerbaijan, and Canada’s ability to provide consular services there is extremely limited.

See Security for more information.

Security

Security

Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding areas (see Advisory)

The border with Armenia is a closed military zone because of the unresolved dispute over Nagorno-Karabakh. Despite the ceasefire, in effect since 1994, armed clashes along the border with Armenia and the ceasefire line continue. There are numerous landmines in the conflict zones.

Crime

Muggings can occur at night in Baku around popular nightlife spots and in dimly lit areas. Avoid walking alone after dark, do not carry large amounts of cash, and do not display signs of affluence. Keep valuables, passports and other travel documents in a secure place.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur and have the potential to suddenly turn violent. They can lead to significant disruptions to traffic and public transportation. Avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Transportation

Poor driving standards, badly maintained cars, and insufficient lighting make highway travel dangerous outside of Baku. Pedestrians should exercise caution.

Public transportation is poorly maintained, often overcrowded, and unsafe, especially outside of Baku. Avoid the Baku metro, especially after dark.

Only use officially marked, “purple”, taxis, which are metered, have seatbelts, and are cheaper than unmarked taxis. Avoid shared taxis.

Avoid long-distance travel by train. If travel by train is necessary, store personal belongings in a safe place and do not leave the compartment unattended. Ensure the door is secured from the inside.

Air travel

The Government of Canada does not assess foreign domestic airlines’ compliance with international aviation safety standards. See Foreign domestic airlines for more information.

General safety information

Carry adequate identification at all times. Keep a photocopy of your passport in case of loss or seizure.

Tourist facilities are limited outside of Baku, Kuba, Lenkoran, and the Abpsheron Peninsula on the coast of the Caspian Sea.

 

Entry/exit requirements

Entry/exit requirements

It is the sole prerogative of every country or territory to determine who is allowed to enter or exit. Canadian consular officials cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet entry or exit requirements. The following information has been obtained from the Azerbaijani authorities and is subject to change at any time. The country- or territory-specific entry/exit requirements are provided on this page for information purposes only. While every effort is made to provide accurate information, information contained here is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Government of Canada assumes no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided. It is your responsibility to check with the Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan for up-to-date information.

Official (special and diplomatic) passport holders must consult the Official Travel page, as they may be subject to different entry requirements.

Passport

Canadians must present a passport to visit Azerbaijan, which must be valid for at least six months beyond the date of expected departure from that country. Prior to travelling, ask your transportation company about its requirements related to passport validity, which may be more stringent than the country's entry rules.

Temporary passport holders may be subject to different entry requirements. Check with diplomatic representatives for up-to-date information.

Visas

Canadians must be in possession of a visa to visit Azerbaijan.

Tourist visa: Required
Business and education visa: Required
Visitor visa: Required
Transit visa: Required

Tourists must obtain a tourist visa from one of a list of tourism companies operating in Azerbaijan. The list can be obtained from the Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan. Other types of visa must be obtained from the Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan prior to departure.

To obtain a transit visa, you must provide a copy of a round-trip ticket.

To obtain any type of visa, you must present a letter of invitation from a contact in Azerbaijan, such as an employer or educational institution. If you do not have a contact in Azerbaijan, the invitation letter should be submitted by the travel agency in Azerbaijan.

Please note that visas must be obtained prior to leaving Canada, as visas are not available upon arrival in Azerbaijan.

Registration

If you plan to stay for more than 3 days, you must register with police upon arrival and ensure that your passport is stamped with a residency stamp.

Nagorno-Karabakh

You may encounter long delays or be denied entry at the Azerbaijani border if your passport contains a stamp from the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region.

Violations of entry and exit regulations can result in serious penalties.

Yellow fever

See Health to obtain information on this country’s vaccination requirements.

Children and travel

Children need special documentation to visit certain countries. See Children for more information.

Health

Health

Related Travel Health Notices
Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.
Vaccines

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Vaccines to Consider

You may be at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases while travelling in this country. Talk to your travel health provider about which ones are right for you.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a disease of the liver spread through contaminated food and water or contact with an infected person. All those travelling to regions with a risk of hepatitis A infection should get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenza occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Get the flu shot.

Measles

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease and is common in most parts of the world. Be sure your measles vaccination is up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Rabies

Rabies is a deadly illness spread to humans through a bite, scratch or lick from an infected animal. Vaccination should be considered for travellers going to areas where rabies exists and who have a high risk of exposure (i.e., close contact with animals, occupational risk, and children).

Yellow Fever Vaccination

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.
Risk
  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.
Country Entry Requirement*
  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.
Recommendation
  • Vaccination is not recommended.
Food/Water

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers' diarrhea from consuming contaminated water or food.

In some areas in Western Asia, food and water can also carry diseases like cholera, hepatitis A, schistosomiasis and typhoid. Practise safe food and water precautions while travelling in Western Asia. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Travellers' diarrhea
  • Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.
  • Risk of developing travellers' diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.
  • The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.
Typhoid

Typhoid is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among pediatric travellers, travellers going to rural areas, visiting friends and relatives or travelling for a long period of time. Travellers at high risk visiting regions with typhoid risk, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation should speak to a health care provider about vaccination.


Insects

Insects and Illness

In some areas in Western Asia, certain insects carry and spread diseases like chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, dengue fever, leishmaniasismalaria, Rift Valley fever, and West Nile virus.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bites.


Malaria

Malaria

  • There is a risk of malaria in certain areas and/or during a certain time of year in this country.
  • Malaria is a serious and occasionally fatal disease that is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. There is no vaccine against malaria.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. This includes covering up, using insect repellent and staying in enclosed air-conditioned accommodations. You may also consider pre-treating clothing and travel gear with insecticides and sleeping under an insecticide-treated bednet.
  • Antimalarial medication may be recommended depending on your itinerary and the time of year you are travelling. See a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic, preferably six weeks before you travel to discuss your options.

Animals

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats. Certain infections found in some areas in Western Asia, like avian influenza and rabies, can be shared between humans and animals.

Avian Influenza

There have been human cases of avian influenza in this country. Avian influenza is a viral infection that can spread quickly and easily among birds and in rare cases, it can infect people.

Avoid high risk areas such as poultry farms and live animal markets including areas where poultry may be slaughtered.  Avoid contact with birds (alive or dead) and surfaces that may have bird droppings or secretions on them. Ensure all poultry dishes, including eggs, are well cooked.


Person-to-Person

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your hands often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the flu and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care provider.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.


Medical services and facilities

Standards of service differ from those in Canada. Avoid older medical clinics dating from the Soviet era as they often lack basic drugs and equipment and have poor hygiene standards. Medical facilities outside Baku are very limited.

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kit, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

Laws & culture

Laws & culture

You are subject to local laws. See Arrest and detention for more information.

An International Driving Permit is required.

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is not legally recognized in Azerbaijan. If local authorities consider you an Azerbaijani citizen, they may refuse to grant you access to Canadian consular services, thereby preventing Canadian consular officials from providing you with those services. You should always travel using your valid Canadian passport and present yourself as Canadian to foreign authorities at all times to minimize this risk. You may also need to carry and present an Azerbaijani passport for legal reasons, for example to enter and exit the country (see Entry/exit requirements to determine passport requirements). Citizenship is determined solely by national laws, and the decision to recognize dual citizenship rests completely with the country in which you are located when seeking consular assistance. See Travelling as a dual citizen for more information.

Canadians with Azerbaijani citizenship may be subject to national obligations, such as taxes, and should check their status with the Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan in Canada prior to travelling.

Illegal or restricted activities

Homosexual activity is legal but is not widely accepted in Azerbaijani society.

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are strict. Convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines.

There is zero tolerance for drinking and driving.

It is strictly forbidden to take pictures of military installations and of military equipment. Photographing or visiting military depots or equipment can lead to arrest.

Religious proselytizing is not permitted.

Customs

Customs authorities strictly enforce regulations concerning the import or export of such items as firearms, religious materials, pieces of art and antiquities.

You must declare foreign currency upon entry and you cannot leave with more than you brought in.

Dress and behaviour

While Azerbaijan is a secular state, some people closely adhere to Islamic practices and beliefs. Behave discreetly, and respect religious and social traditions to avoid offending local sensitivities.

During the lunar month of Ramadan (the ninth month of the Muslim calendar), use discretion when drinking, eating, and smoking in public between sunrise and sunset. In 2017, Ramadan is expected to begin on or around May 27.

Money

The currency is the Azerbaijani manat (AZN). The economy is cash-based. Canadian currency and traveller's cheques are not accepted, and U.S. dollar traveller’s cheques are not widely accepted. Arrive with cash in U.S. dollars. Torn dollar bills are not easily exchangeable; all notes should be in pristine condition. Credit cards are accepted at banks in Baku and in a few major hotels and some restaurants. Carry local or U.S. currency outside of Baku, as few establishments accept credit cards. Several automated banking machines in Baku dispense both U.S. dollars and Azerbaijani manat.

Natural disasters & climate

Natural disasters & climate

Azerbaijan is subject to periods of drought and is located in an active seismic zone.

Heavy rains may trigger floods and landslides.

Assistance

Assistance

Local services

Emergency services

In case of emergency, dial:

  • police: 102
  • medical assistance: 103
  • firefighters: 101

Consular assistance

There is no resident Canadian government office in Azerbaijan.You can obtain consular assistance and further consular information from the Embassy of Canada in Ankara, Turkey.

Ankara - Embassy of Canada
Street AddressCinnah Caddesi No. 58, Çankaya 06690, Ankara, TurkeyTelephone90 (312) 409-2700Fax90 (312) 409-2712Emailankra@international.gc.caInternetwww.turkey.gc.caServicesPassport Services AvailableTwitter@CanEmbTurkeyOther social media @KanadaTurkiye

For emergency assistance after hours, call the Embassy of Canada in Ankara and follow the instructions. You may also call the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa at 613-996-8885.


The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. The Government of Canada takes the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provides credible and timely information in its Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad. In the event of a large-scale emergency, every effort will be made to provide assistance. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

See Large-scale emergencies abroad for more information.

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