Mandatory quarantine or isolation

All travellers entering Canada, regardless of citizenship, must follow testing and quarantine requirements to keep Canadians safe, particularly given the new COVID-19 variants in Canada and around the world.

On this page

Planning your mandatory quarantine

First, determine whether you can enter Canada.

Find out if you can travel to Canada

Federal quarantine applies for travellers entering Canada. If you can enter Canada and you have no symptoms, you must quarantine for a minimum of 14 days.

At this time, you are not excluded from quarantine, even if you have:

Flying into Canada – your quarantine period includes a mandatory 3 night pre-paid booking at a government-authorized hotel at your own cost.

Plan and book your hotel stopover

Assess your quarantine plan

As a traveller, you must demonstrate that you have a suitable plan for quarantine.

You'll need to confirm you have a suitable place to quarantine where you:

Shared living spaces where you can't quarantine

You cannot quarantine in group living environments

Some examples include:

  • a small apartment you share with others
  • a shared household with a large family or families or many people
  • a shelter, group home, group residence, hostels, industrial camps, construction trailers or other group setting
  • a student residence (unless you’ve received prior authorization)
  • shared living spaces with housemates who haven’t travelled with you that you cannot avoid interacting with

For a full list of examples, visit the Congregate living settings section.

Avoiding contact with people at risk

You cannot quarantine in a place where you will have contact with people who

  • are 65 years or older
  • have underlying medical conditions
  • have compromised immune systems
  • work or assist in a facility, home or workplace that includes at-risk populations, including:
    • Nurses, doctors, other healthcare professionals, personal support workers, social workers
    • First responders, such as paramedics
    • Cleaning and maintenance staff, receptionists and administrative staff, food services staff, volunteers, essential visitors to those living in long-term care facilities

You may only quarantine with people in these situations if:

  • they consent to the quarantine or are the parent or minor in a parent-minor relationship
  • you complete a form with a government representative at the border crossing explaining the consent and receive authorization to proceed

In these limited circumstances, a government representative will confirm consent.

Using a hotel to complete your quarantine

If you are not displaying symptoms, you may be allowed to complete your quarantine at a hotel. A Government of Canada representative can give you instructions. While staying at a hotel, you must:

  • stay in your room to avoid contact with others
  • practise physical distancing
  • practice good hand hygiene and cough etiquette at all times
  • use a delivery service and ask that the meal be left outside the door of your hotel room
If you do not have a suitable place to quarantine

Some travellers may be unable to quarantine at home or their final destination. In these cases, travellers are expected to make alternative arrangements for their return to Canada. Although alternative accommodations (e.g. with family or friends, or paid accommodation) may be suitable, the Government of Canada does not reimburse for expenses incurred for accommodations, including hotels, RV rentals and trailer park or campground fees.

Make your quarantine plans in advance of your arrival to Canada. Foreign nationals who do not have a suitable plan may be denied entry into Canada. If you do not have a suitable place to quarantine, you may be directed to a federal designated quarantine facility where you must remain for your entire mandatory quarantine.

Before travellers are directed to a federal designated quarantine facility, government representatives may work with them to confirm that all other options for quarantine accommodations within their own means have been exhausted.

These facilities are a last resort for travellers who have no options of meeting quarantine requirements by other means.

Where required, transportation from the border crossing to a federal designated quarantine facility is provided by the Government of Canada.

Submit your quarantine plan

If coming to Canada as a final destination, all travellers must use ArriveCAN to submit their plan.

Use ArriveCAN to submit your travel and quarantine plans

You will be asked questions about your plans for quarantine upon arrival.

How to quarantine

When your quarantine starts and ends

Your quarantine period begins on the day that you arrive in Canada.

For example, if you arrive at 8:15 am on Thursday, October 1, then Thursday is considered day 1 of your quarantine period. Your quarantine period would end 14 full days later, at 11:59 pm on Wednesday, October 14 if you received your Day-8 negative test result

If you begin to show symptoms during your quarantine, are exposed to another traveller with symptoms, or test positive for COVID-19, you must begin an additional 14 days of isolation.

Leaving Canada during your quarantine period

You may choose to leave Canada before the end of the 14-day quarantine period. However, you must:

  • continue to quarantine yourself until your departure date
  • wear a mask when you depart Canada
  • comply with all regulations for the country of destination

You must use a private vehicle to depart Canada. You will not be allowed to board a flight if you are currently under a quarantine order.

If you are in a federal designated quarantine facility, you must get authorization from a quarantine officer to leave.

COVID-19 testing or medical emergencies while in quarantine

You may seek testing or medical treatment, provided that you resume your quarantine immediately afterwards.

If you need assistance to access medical treatment, an exception may be made to allow one other person to accompany you, which can include a person who is also under mandatory quarantine.

If the person who needs to visit a health care facility is a dependent child, the exception extends to one other person who accompanies them.

Definition of a dependent child

Children qualify as dependants if they:

  • are under 22 years old and
  • don’t have a spouse or partner

Children 22 or older qualify as dependants if they:

  • have depended on their parents for financial support since before they were 22 and
  • can’t financially support themselves because of a mental or physical condition

Should you develop symptoms or test positive for COVID-19 during quarantine, you must begin isolation for an additional 14 days from the date of your positive COVID-19 test or the date your symptoms started.

You must:

  • wear a mask unless you are alone in a private vehicle
  • practice physical distancing at all times, where possible
  • if possible, use private transportation such as a private vehicle to reach your place of quarantine and follow any additional instructions from local public health authorities

Agricultural, agri-food and seafood employers

There are specific requirements for the employers of this group of temporary foreign workers.

Agricultural, agri-food and seafood quarantine and testing requirements

Getting to your place of quarantine (final destination)

Driving to your place of quarantine

While you travel, you must wear a mask and practice physical distancing at all times.

Avoid stops and contact with others while in transit to quarantine:

  • Use a private vehicle if possible
  • Remain in the vehicle as much as possible
  • Pay at the pump for gas and use drive through when you need food
  • Wear a suitable mask at all times unless you are alone in a private vehicle
  • Practice physical distancing
  • Sanitize your hands frequently and avoid touching surfaces
Travelling on to your place of quarantine after your hotel stopover

You must receive a negative result from your arrival test before continuing your trip from the hotel. While you travel, you must wear a mask and practice physical distancing at all times.

Examples:

  • A Winnipeg bound international traveller flying into Vancouver, will stop over at a government-authorized hotel in Vancouver. After a negative test result, that traveller could take their flight to Winnipeg to go to their place of quarantine.
  • An Ottawa bound international traveller flying into Montréal, will stop over at a government-authorized hotel in Montréal. After a negative test result, that traveller could drive or take a bus to go to their place of quarantine in Ottawa by the most reasonable route.

Avoid stops and contact with others while in transit to quarantine:

  • Use a private vehicle if possible
  • Remain in the vehicle as much as possible
  • Pay at the pump for gas and use drive through when you need food
  • Wear a suitable mask at all times unless you are alone in a private vehicle
  • Practice physical distancing
  • Sanitize your hands frequently and avoid touching surfaces

Check provincial or territorial requirements

How to report after you've entered Canada

The day after you arrive in Canada, all travellers, whether you travel by air, land or marine, must use ArriveCAN to:

Report via ArriveCAN or phone

While in quarantine

Quarantining with others in the same household

Mandatory quarantine only applies to travellers who have entered Canada.

Travellers who are under quarantine must avoid contact with anyone they did not travel with:

  • stay in separate rooms
  • use separate bathrooms (if possible)
  • keep surfaces clean
  • avoid sharing personal items
  • limit interactions with others in the household

Co-habitants should also follow the guidance of their local public health authorities.

Expect calls, emails and visits from the Government of Canada

The Government of Canada uses the information you provided in ArriveCAN to verify that you:

You will receive live or automated calls. You must answer calls from 1-888-336-7735 and answer all questions truthfully to demonstrate your compliance with the law.

You will receive email reminders of your quarantine requirements.

Getting a visit from a screening officer

You may also receive in-person visits from a screening officer at your place of quarantine.

Designated screening officers are contracted and trained to conduct on-site visits on behalf of the Government of Canada.

To protect your health and safety, screening officers wear personal protective equipment and will practice physical distancing.

Screening officers will:

  • ask to speak to you by name
  • show their company identification
  • show their authorization from the Public Health Agency of Canada, which may be signed by hand or electronically
  • ask you for Government-issued identification, such as passport or driver’s license, to confirm your identity
  • ask questions to verify you are following the quarantine requirements

Screening officers will not:

  • ask to enter your home
  • copy or retain your identification
  • issue fines
  • request or accept payment of any kind, including cash, for outstanding fines

COVID-19 testing during your quarantine

All travellers are required to take a COVID-19 test on arrival and another on Day 8 of their quarantine. Follow the testing instructions for your method of entry:

Flying to Canada: COVID-19 testing requirements
Driving to Canada: COVID-19 testing requirements

Quarantine handout for travellers entering by land

Quarantine handout for travellers entering by air

Who is exempt from quarantine

You may be exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirements under certain conditions, including if you:

There are no exceptions for vaccinated travellers, at this time.

Crossing the border for work: documents you may need

It is the traveller’s responsibility to demonstrate that they are eligible to enter Canada, including if they qualify for an exemption from mandatory testing or quarantine measures.

Government representatives at the border use the information available at the time of entry to determine what instructions will be provided to a traveller regarding their public health obligations.

Travellers must meet the relevant criteria to be considered an essential service provider under the Emergency Orders. They may be exempt from the mandatory requirements if they meet the relevant criteria and they are entering for the purpose of that function. Travellers who are exempt from quarantine as essential service providers, are workers whose job is included in the Chief Public Health Officer Group Exemption list (see Essential Reasons: quarantine exemption list below).

When you enter Canada, a government representative will ask questions and consider multiple factors, including supporting documents and your previous travel history. They may ask for:

  • your identification and proof of residence
  • confirmation of employment
  • confirmation of your normal place of employment
  • confirmation of your past travel history to establish a pattern of travel frequency
  • if required, demonstrated immediate nature of work required in Canada and why you are unable to quarantine for 14 days
  • documentation from your employer as to why the travel is required and how the travel meets one of the exemptions under the Emergency Order

There are strict requirements you must follow even if you are exempt from quarantine. You must:

Although your reason for entering Canada may fall under an exemption, you may still have to follow certain provincial and territorial restrictions (which may include quarantine), depending on your destination. Being exempt from quarantine does not mean you’re exempt from the pre-entry test requirements.

Essential reasons: quarantine exemption list

If you are in one of these situations, you may be exempt from mandatory quarantine.

Medical and health care

  • Essential medical services - a person who enters Canada for the purpose of receiving essential medical services or treatments within 36 hours of entering Canada, other than services or treatments related to COVID-19 as long as they remain under medical supervision for the 14-day period that begins on the day on which they enter Canada
  • Student in a health field - a person permitted to work in Canada as a student in a health field under paragraph 186(p) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations who enters Canada for the purpose of performing their duties as a student in the health field, as long as they do not directly care for persons 65 years of age or older within the 14-day period that begins on the day on which the person enters Canada
  • Medical services, transport or deliveries - a person who enters Canada for the purpose of providing medical care, transporting or collecting essential medical equipment, supplies or means of treatment, or delivering, maintaining or repairing medically-necessary equipment or devices, as long as they do not directly care for persons 65 years of age or older within the 14-day period that begins on the day on which the person enters Canada
  • Health care practitioners - a licensed health care practitioner with proof of employment in Canada who enters for the purpose of performing their duties as a licensed health practitioner, as long as they do not directly care for persons 65 years of age or older within the 14-day period that begins on the day on which the licensed practitioner enters Canada
  • Medical treatments - persons who must leave and return to Canada to receive essential medical services in another country. One person may accompany them. They must have:
    • written evidence from a licensed health care practitioner in Canada indicating services or treatments outside Canada are essential unless the services or treatments are for primary or emergency medical services under an agreement with another jurisdiction (e.g. RM Piney in Southeast Manitoba)
    • written evidence from a licensed health care practitioner in the foreign country indicating services or treatments were provided in that country

Essential work considered exempt under the Emergency Orders

  • A person or any person in a class of persons whom the Chief Public Health Officer determines will provide an essential service:
    • Persons in the trade or transportation sector who are important for the movement of goods or people, including truck drivers and crew members on any aircraft, shipping vessel or train, and that cross the border while performing their duties or for the purpose of performing their duties;
    • Technicians or specialists specified by a government, manufacturer, or company, who enter Canada as required for the purpose of maintaining, repairing, installing or inspecting equipment necessary to support critical infrastructure (Energy and Utilities, Information and Communication Technologies, Finance, Health, Food, Water, Transportation, Safety, Government and Manufacturing) and are required to provide their services within 14 days of their entry to Canada and have reasonable rationales for the immediacy of the work and the inability to plan for a 14 day quarantine;
    • Emergency service providers, including firefighters, peace officers, and paramedics, who return from providing such services in another country and are required to provide their services within 14 days of their return to Canada;
    • Commercial conveyance operators repatriating human remains into Canada;
    • Persons, including a captain, deckhand, observer, inspector, scientist, veterinarian and any other person supporting commercial or research open water aquaculture-related activities, who enter Canada for the purpose of carrying out aquaculture-related activities, including fishing, transporting fish to and from the aquaculture facility, treating fish for pests or pathogens, repairs, provisioning of aquaculture-related vessels or aquaculture facilities or exchange of crew and who proceed directly to an open water facility or vessel upon entry to Canada;
    • Officials of the Government of Canada or a foreign government, including border services officers, immigration enforcement officers, law enforcement and correctional officers, who are escorting individuals travelling to Canada or from Canada pursuant to a legal process such as deportation, extradition or international transfer of offenders; and
    • Officials of the Government of Canada, a provincial or a foreign government, including law enforcement, border enforcement, and immigration enforcement officers, who enter Canada for the purposes of law, border or immigration enforcement, or national security activities that support active investigations, ensure continuity of enforcement operations or activities, or transfer information or evidence pursuant to, or in support, of a legal process, and who are required to provide their services within 14 days of entry and have reasonable rationales for the immediacy of the work and the inability to plan for a 14 day quarantine.
    • Members of a crew for any conveyance who are re-entering Canada after having left to undertake mandatory training relating to the operation of a conveyance, and who are required by their employer to return to work as members of a crew on a conveyance within 14 days of their return to Canada.
  • A crew member as defined in subsection 101.01(1) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations or a person who enters Canada only to become such a crew member
  • A member of a crew as defined in subsection 3(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations or a person who enters Canada only to become such a crew member
  • A member of the Canadian Forces or a visiting force as defined in section 2 of the Visiting Forces Act, who enters Canada for the purpose of performing their duties as a member of either of those forces
  • A person who seeks to enter Canada on board a vessel, as defined in section 2 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, that is engaged in research and that is operated by or under the authority of the Government of Canada or at its request or operated by a provincial government, a local authority or a government, council or other entity authorized to act on behalf of an Indigenous group. as long as the person remains onboard the vessel.

Cross-border workers and trans-border, remote cross-border or geographically constrained communities

  • Persons who must cross the border regularly to go to their normal place of employment, including critical infrastructure workers (Energy and Utilities, Information and Communication Technologies, Finance, Health, Food, Water, Transportation, Safety, Government and Manufacturing), provided they do not directly care for persons 65 years of age or older within the first 14 days after their entry to Canada;
  • A person who enters Canada within the boundaries of an integrated trans-border community that exists on both sides of the Canada-United States border and who is a habitual resident of that community, if entering Canada is necessary for carrying out an everyday function within that community; such as buying groceries or gas when the community access is in Canada, such as the Akwesasne community
  • A person who enters Canada if the entry is necessary to return to their habitual place of residence in Canada after carrying out an everyday function (such as getting groceries, going to work, or seeing a doctor) that, due to geographical constraints, must involve entering the United States.
  • A habitual resident of the remote communities of Northwest Angle, Minnesota or Hyder, Alaska who enters Canada only to access necessities of life from the closest Canadian community where such necessities of life are available and
  • A habitual resident of the remote communities of Campobello Island, New Brunswick or Stewart, British Columbia who enters Canada after having entered the United States only to access necessities of life from the closest American community where such necessities of life are available.

Cross-border students and people driving them

  • A student who is enrolled at an approved designated learning institution, who attends that institution regularly and who enters Canada to go to that institution, as long as the government of the province and the local health authority of the place where that listed institution is located have indicated to the Public Health Agency of Canada that the listed institution is approved to accommodate students who are exempted from quarantine and isolation requirements.
  • A driver of a vehicle who enters Canada to drop off or pick up a student who is attending an approved designated learning institution, as long as the driver only leaves the vehicle while in Canada, if at all, to escort the student to or from the listed institution and they wear a mask while outside the vehicle
  • A student who is enrolled at an educational institution in the United States, who attends that educational institution regularly and who enters Canada to return to their habitual place of residence after attending that educational institution, if they will not directly care for persons 65 years of age or older
  • A driver of a vehicle who enters Canada after dropping off or picking up a student who is enrolled at an educational institution in the United States at that institution, and who enters Canada to return to their habitual place of residence after dropping off or picking up the student from that institution, as long as the driver only leaves the vehicle while outside Canada, if at all, to escort the student to or from the institution and they wore a mask while outside the vehicle

Cross-border custody arrangements

  • A dependent child who enters Canada under the terms of a written agreement or court order regarding custody, access or parenting
  • A driver of a vehicle who enters Canada to drop off or pick up a dependent child under the terms of a written agreement or court order regarding custody, access or parenting, as long as the driver only leaves the vehicle while in Canada, if at all, to escort the dependent child to or from the vehicle and they wear a mask while outside the vehicle
  • A driver of a vehicle who enters Canada after dropping off or picking up a dependent child under the terms of a written agreement or court order regarding custody, access or parenting, as long as the driver only left the vehicle while outside Canada, if at all, to escort the dependent child to or from the vehicle and they wore a mask while outside the vehicle

Other special circumstances

  • By invitation - A person who enters Canada at the invitation of the Minister of Health for the purpose of assisting in the COVID-19 response
  • National interest - A person or any person in a class of persons whose presence in Canada is determined by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration or the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness to be in the national interest, as long as the person complies with any conditions imposed on them by the relevant Minister to minimize the risk of introduction or spread of COVID-19
  • Land border crossing - A person who enters Canada in a vehicle at a land border crossing in the following circumstances, as long as the person or passengers remained in the vehicle while outside Canada:
    • the person was denied entry to the United States at the land border crossing, or
    • the person entered the territory of the United States but did not seek legal entry to the United States at the land border crossing.
  • Provincial and territorial projects - A person who, under an arrangement entered into between the Minister of Health and the minister responsible for health care in the province where the person enters Canada, is participating in a project to gather information to inform the development of quarantine requirements other than those set out in this Order, as long as the person complies with any conditions imposed on them by the Minister of Health to minimize the risk of introduction or spread of COVID-19
  • Amateur sports - A person who enters Canada to take part in an international single sport event that has been authorized by the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage (a high-performance athlete or someone engaged in an essential role in relation to that event, affiliated with a national organization responsible for that sport), as long as the person complies with any conditions imposed on them to minimize the risk of introduction or spread of COVID-19.

For more information, go to the List of Acts and Regulations and look for information on the Quarantine Act, the Emergency Orders, and the Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) Group Exemptions that may apply.

Compassionate reasons: limited release for funerals, to care for someone, or for end-of-life visit

Based on your reason for travel, you may apply for a limited release from quarantine for compassionate reasons. If you’re approved, your limited release from quarantine is valid only for the location(s) and purpose specified in your application

Some provinces and territories may not allow for limited release from quarantine for compassionate reasons. This means that even if you receive approval from the Public Health Agency of Canada a province or territory may have additional restrictions. In the event of conflicting requirements between federal restrictions and provincial or territorial travel restrictions, you must comply with those that are the most stringent.

To apply for compassionate entry and limited release from quarantine for compassionate reasons, see Caring for others, funerals and support.

Interpreting the exemptions or additional questions about the Emergency Order

For help interpreting the exemptions or if you have additional questions about the Emergency Order.

Call us at: 1-833-784-4397

Penalties, fines and reporting someone

How to provide a tip that a traveller is not following quarantine rules

Call your local police non-emergency line to report someone who appears to be breaking quarantine.

Consequences for failure to comply with the Emergency Order

Failure to comply with this order is an offence under the Quarantine Act and could lead to fines, imprisonment or both.

Visits from law enforcement officers

At any time, if the Government of Canada has reason to believe you are not complying with the Emergency Order, you may be referred to law enforcement for follow up. This includes if you:

  • provide false information
  • fail to respond to calls and emails
  • do not answer relevant compliance questions when asked by a screening officer
  • do not come to the door or are not home when visited by a screening officer

Law enforcement officers may visit and can issue:

  • verbal warnings
  • written warnings
  • fines, tickets or penalties
  • court summons

Penalties, fines and imprisonment

Violating any instructions provided to you when you entered Canada is an offence under the Quarantine Act and could lead to up to:

If you break your mandatory quarantine or isolation requirements and you cause the death or serious bodily harm to another person, you could face:

The Contraventions Act provides police (including RCMP, provincial and local police) the authority to enforce the Quarantine Act. Tickets with fines of up to $3,000 may be issues for non-compliance.

With symptoms: Mandatory isolation

Foreign nationals with symptoms will not be allowed to enter Canada.

Only Canadian citizens, permanent residents, persons registered under the Indian Act, and protected persons (refugee status) may enter Canada with symptoms. You will not be able to board a flight and enter Canada by air if you have symptoms.

You must go directly to the place where you will isolate and stay there for 14 days. This is mandatory and starts from the date you arrive in Canada.

During the 14-day period from the time you enter Canada, you are required to answer any relevant questions asked by a Government of Canada employee.

Isolating upon returning to Canada

If you are arriving by air and show symptoms you will be directed to a federal quarantine facility or another suitable place of isolation.

If you are arriving by land and show symptoms, you must demonstrate that you have an adequate plan for isolation to avoid infecting others. You are expected to make plans, within your own means, before travelling to Canada. If you do not have a suitable place, you will be directed to a federal quarantine facility.

Where you can isolate with symptoms

You'll need to confirm you have a suitable place to isolate where you:

  • can stay for 14 days or possibly longer
  • have access to the necessities of life, including water, food, medication and heat without leaving isolation
  • can avoid contact with others who did not travel with you
  • have no visits from family or guests

You must isolate in a place where you won't have contact with people who:

  • are 65 years or older
  • have underlying medical conditions
  • have compromised immune systems
  • work or assist in a facility, home or workplace that includes at-risk populations, including:
    • Nurses, doctors, other healthcare professionals, personal support workers, social workers, and developmental services support staff
    • First responders, such as paramedics, police officers, firefighters
    • Cleaning and maintenance staff, receptionists and administrative staff, food services staff, volunteers, essential visitors to those living in long-term care facilities

You may only isolate with people in these situations if:

  • they consent to the isolation or are the parent or minor in a parent-minor relationship
  • you complete a form with a government representative at the border crossing explaining the consent and receive authorization to proceed

In these limited circumstances, a government representative will confirm consent.

You cannot isolate in group living environments

Some examples include:

  • a shelter, group home, group residence, hostels, industrial camps, construction trailers or other group setting
  • a student residence (unless you’ve received prior authorization)
  • a small apartment you share with others
  • a shared household with a large family or families or many people
  • shared living spaces with housemates who haven’t travelled with you that you cannot avoid interacting with

For a full list of examples, visit the Congregate living settings section.

Isolating with symptoms with others in the same household

Mandatory isolation only applies to travellers who have entered Canada.

Travellers who are under isolation should avoid contact with others and:

  • stay in separate rooms
  • use separate bathrooms (if possible)
  • keep surfaces clean
  • avoid sharing personal items
  • limit interactions with others in the household

Co-habitants should also follow the guidance of their local public health authorities.

Getting to your place of isolation with symptoms (final destination)
  • Go directly to your place of isolation without delay and stay there for 14 days from the date you arrived in Canada
  • You must use private transportation (such as your own vehicle or a private aircraft) to get to your place of isolation
  • You must wear a medical mask (where possible) or suitable non-medical mask while travelling to your place of isolation unless you are alone in a private vehicle
  • Practice physical distancing at all times and avoid contact with others
  • We encourage all travellers to check provincial and territorial restrictions
How to report after you've entered Canada

All travellers, whether you travel by land, air or sea, must report their arrival at their place of isolation within 48 hours after entry into Canada.

You will receive phone calls or public health follow-ups upon your arrival in Canada. If you don't complete your reports after you’ve entered Canada, you will be in violation of the Emergency Order, you may receive phone calls or public health follow-ups. Failure to comply with this order is an offence under the Quarantine Act and could lead to fines.

Find out how to report via ArriveCAN or phone

If you do not have a suitable place to isolate or do not have private transportation

Make your quarantine plans in advance of your arrival at the border crossing. If you do not have an adequate place to isolate, or do not have private transportation to your place of isolation, you will be directed to a federal designated quarantine facility where you must remain for 14 days. Before travellers are directed to a federal designated quarantine facility government representatives will work to confirm that all other options for isolation accommodations within their own means have been exhausted.

These facilities are a last resort for travellers who have no options of meeting isolation requirements by other means.

Where required, transportation from the border crossing to a federal designated quarantine facility will be provided by the Government of Canada.

COVID-19 testing or medical emergencies while in isolation

You may seek testing or time-sensitive medical treatment, provided that you resume your designated quarantine immediately afterwards. During your isolation, you must undergo any health assessments that a quarantine officer requires

You must:

  • wear a medical mask (if possible) or mask
  • practice physical distancing at all times, where possible
  • use private transportation only, such as your private vehicle
  • follow any additional instructions from your local public health authorities
If you leave Canada while showing symptoms

You will not be able to take public transportation. You must depart using private transportation only, such as your private vehicle. You will not be able to board a flight to depart Canada. You must also comply with all regulations for the country of destination.

You must:

  • wear a medical mask (where possible) or non-medical mask while in transit
  • practice physical distancing at all times, where possible
  • avoid contact with others while in transit
    • remain in the vehicle
    • do not stay at a hotel on the way to your new destination
    • if you need gas, pay at the pump
    • if you need food, use a drive through
    • if you need to use a rest area, put on your mask and be mindful of physical distancing and good hygiene practices

If you are in a federal designated quarantine facility, you must get authorization from a quarantine officer to leave.

Print an isolation handout to share in different languages

Isolation handout for travellers with symptoms entering by land

Isolation handout for travellers with symptoms entering by air

Driving and flying checklists

In addition to quarantine, you must meet testing and reporting requirements when coming to Canada. Use the checklist that applies to you:

Did you find what you were looking for?

What was wrong?

You will not receive a reply. Telephone numbers and email addresses will be removed.
Maximum 300 characters

Thank you for your feedback

Date modified: