Find out if you can enter Canada

To limit the further spread of coronavirus in Canada, travel restrictions are in place across all ports of entry.

Answer a few questions to find out if you may be allowed to enter Canada.

Disclaimer: This tool provides information only. It was created to assist you to determine if you can enter Canada at this time. Final determination on entry and quarantine is made by a government representative at the port of entry based on the information presented at the time of entry.

Information in this tool is based on the Orders in Council (OIC) in effect and is subject to change according to effective dates. For more information, consult COVID-19 Emergency OICs in effect.

If you are travelling as a group, this should be completed for each person.

See the rules used to determine if you can enter Canada

This tool has been designed to give you an answer for the majority of reasons for entry into Canada. The rules are different for Canadians and foreign nationals.

Canadian citizens (including dual citizens), permanent residents, persons registered under the Indian Act, and protected person

Canadians with symptoms

If you’re a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada, a person registered under the Indian Act, or protected person, and you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should be able to enter Canada by land or by sea. You will not be able to board a public flight and enter by air if you have symptoms.

You must have a suitable place and plan to isolate. This is mandatory.

Canadians without symptoms

If you’re a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada, a person registered under the Indian Act, or protected persons, and you don’t have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you are able to enter Canada.

Unless you are exempt, you will need to follow the testing requirements for your method of entry:

You must have a suitable place and plan to quarantine. This is mandatory, unless your reason for entry is considered quarantine exempt.

Provincial and territorial requirements

You may have to comply with additional quarantine requirements make declarations of your arrival or other restrictions depending on which province or territory is your final destination.

Dual Canadian citizens

If you’re a dual Canadian citizen, you can only enter Canada with a:

Foreign nationals coming from the U.S. (including connections, so long as you enter Canada from the U.S.)

Temporary border restriction implemented on March 21, 2020 continues.

Foreigners with symptoms

If you’re a foreign national and you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you will not be able to enter Canada.

Foreigners without symptoms

You must have a suitable place and plan to quarantine. This is mandatory, unless your reason for entry is considered quarantine exempt. If you do not have a plan, you may be denied entry into Canada.

Unless you are exempt, you will need to follow the testing requirements for your method of entry:

No entry for optional reasons

A foreign national will be denied entry into Canada for discretionary (optional) reasons such as:

  • leisure, tourism, visiting friends
  • social gatherings, weddings
  • being a property owner in Canada

Entry for non-discretionary (non-optional) reasons

Foreigners entering from the U.S may only enter to:

Reunite with family in Canada
If your family member is a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada or a person registered under the Indian Act

Only immediate family members, or the extended family members of Canadian citizens, permanent residents, or persons registered under the Indian Act may enter for the purpose of reuniting.

To be considered an immediate family member, you must be in one of the following relationships:

  • you’re the spouse or common-law partner of the person
  • you’re the dependent child of the person, or of the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the dependent child of a dependent child (grandchild) of the person
  • you’re the parent or step-parent of the person, or of the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the guardian or tutor of the person

To be considered an extended family member, you must be in one of the following relationships:

  • you’ve been in an exclusive dating relationship with the person for at least one year, and you’ve spent physical time together
  • you’re the dependent child of someone who is in an exclusive dating relationship with the person
  • you’re the adult child (non-dependent child) of the person, of the person’s spouse, of the person’s common-law partner or of someone who is an exclusive dating relationship with the person
  • you’re the grandchild (dependent child of a non-dependent child) of the person, of the person’s spouse, of the person’s common-law partner or of someone who is an exclusive dating relationship with the person
  • you’re the sibling, half-sibling or step-sibling of the person, of the person’s spouse or of the person’s common-law partner
  • you’re the grandparent of the person, of the person’s spouse or of the person’s common-law partner

Only these relationships are considered immediate family. Any other relationship (like brother, sister, aunt, adult child who is no longer dependent, someone in an exclusive dating relationship, etc.) will not be allowed entry for the purpose of reuniting with a family member who is a temporary resident.

As an immediate or extended family member of a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, or a person registered under the Indian Act you may be allowed to enter Canada if you will be staying for at least 15 days to reunite with your family.

If your family member is a temporary resident of Canada

To be considered an immediate family member, you must be in one of the following relationships:

  • you’re the spouse or common-law partner of the person
  • you’re the dependent child of the person, or of the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the dependent child of a dependent child (grandchild) of the person
  • you’re the parent or step-parent of the person, or of the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the guardian or tutor of the person

Only these relationships are considered immediate family. Any other relationship (like brother, sister, aunt, adult child who is no longer dependent, etc.) will not be allowed entry for the purpose of reuniting with a family member who is a temporary resident.

To travel to Canada from the U.S. to reunite with an immediate family member who is in Canada temporarily, you must provide evidence that your reason for travel is not optional.

For more information, see Foreign nationals reuniting with family.

Travel for an essential or not discretionary (optional) reason

A foreign national entering from the U.S. will generally be allowed entry, so long as their reason for travel is not optional, such as:

  • working in Canada
  • moving of essential goods or people (air crew, train crew, marine crew, truck driver)
  • some international students
  • invited by the Government of Canada
  • compassionate reasons (for funerals, providing care to someone who is critically ill or has a valid medical reason for needing support)
  • receiving medical care within 36 hours of entering Canada (unrelated to COVID-19)

Transiting through Canada

You may be permitted to transit through Canada to reach another country.

For more information about flights, see Transit to another country by air.

Alaska and the rest of the United States

You will likely be permitted to transit across Canada, but there are several requirements to follow.

For more information, see Transit between Alaska and the rest of the United States

Canadian waters

You cannot enter Canadian waters for optional reasons. You may still navigate through international or Canadian waters while in transit.

For more information, see Transit through Canadian waters

Provincial and territorial requirements

You may have to comply with additional quarantine requirements, make declarations of your arrival or other restrictions depending on which province or territory is your final destination.

Foreign nationals who are coming directly from another country

Temporary border restriction implemented on March 21, 2020 continues.

Foreigners with symptoms

If you’re a foreign national and you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you will not be able to enter Canada.

Foreigners without symptoms

You must have a suitable place and plan to quarantine. This is mandatory, unless your reason for entry is considered exempt from quarantine. If you do not have a plan, you may be denied entry into Canada.

Unless you are exempt, you will need to follow the testing requirements for your method of entry:

No entry for optional reasons

A foreign national will be denied entry into Canada for any optional reason such as:

  • leisure, tourism, visiting friends
  • social gatherings, weddings
  • being a property owner in Canada

Entry is permitted only under certain travel exemptions

Even if you believe your reason for travel is an essential visit, you may only enter Canada to:

Reunite with family in Canada
If your family member is a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident of Canada or a person registered under the Indian Act

Only immediate family members, or the extended family members of Canadian citizens, permanent residents, or persons registered under the Indian Act may enter for the purpose of reuniting.

To be considered an immediate family member, you must be in one of the following relationships:

  • you’re the spouse or common-law partner of the person
  • you’re the dependent child of the person, or of the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the dependent child of a dependent child (grandchild) of the person
  • you’re the parent or step-parent of the person, or of the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the guardian or tutor of the person

To be considered an extended family member, you must be in one of the following relationships:

  • you’ve been in an exclusive dating relationship with the person for at least one year, and you’ve spent physical time together
  • you’re the dependent child of someone who is in an exclusive dating relationship with the person
  • you’re the adult child (non-dependent child) of the person, of the person’s spouse, of the person’s common-law partner or of someone who is an exclusive dating relationship with the person
  • you’re the grandchild (dependent child of a non-dependent child) of the person, of the person’s spouse, of the person’s common-law partner or of someone who is an exclusive dating relationship with the person
  • you’re the sibling, half-sibling or step-sibling of the person, of the person’s spouse or of the person’s common-law partner
  • you’re the grandparent of the person, of the person’s spouse or of the person’s common-law partner

Only these relationships are considered immediate or extended family. Any other relationships (like aunt or uncle, cousins, niece or nephew, etc.) will not be allowed entry for the purpose of reuniting with family.

As an immediate or extended family member of a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, or a person registered under the Indian Act you may be allowed to enter Canada if you will be staying for at least 15 days to reunite with your family.

For more information, see Foreign nationals reuniting with family.

If your family member is a temporary resident of Canada

To be considered an immediate family member, you must be in one of the following relationships:

  • you’re the spouse or common-law partner of the person
  • you’re the dependent child of the person, or the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the dependent child of a dependent child of the person
  • you’re the parent or step-parent of the person, or the person’s spouse or common-law partner
  • you’re the guardian or tutor of the person

Only these relationships are considered immediate family. Any other relationship (like brother, sister, aunt, adult child who is no longer dependent, someone in an exclusive dating relationship, etc.) will not be allowed entry for the purpose of reuniting with a family member who is a temporary resident.

To travel to Canada from the U.S. to reunite with an immediate family member who is in Canada temporarily, you must provide evidence that your reason for travel is not optional.

For more information, see Foreign nationals reuniting with family.

Travel for a specific purpose that is permitted (travel exemption)
  • some temporary foreign workers
  • some international students
  • some approved permanent residents
  • compassionate reasons (for funerals, providing care to someone who is critically ill or has a valid medical reason for needing support)
  • immediate or extended family members of Canadian citizens, persons registered under the Indian Act, or permanent residents of Canada
  • immediate family members of temporary residents of Canada with written authorization from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to reunite
  • members of the Canadian forces, visiting forces and their immediate family members who enter Canada for the purpose of performing their duties
  • accredited diplomats and immediate family members (includes North Atlantic Treaty Organization [NATO], those under the United Nations Headquarters Agreement, other organizations)
  • air and marine crew member
  • French citizens who live in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon and have only been in Canada, the U.S. or Saint-Pierre and Miquelon during the 14 days before the day they seek to enter Canada
  • any person who does not pose a risk of significant harm to public health, as determined by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada, and or who will provide an essential service while in Canada, as long as they comply with any conditions imposed on them to minimize the risk of introduction or spread of COVID-19
  • any person whose presence in Canada is in the national interest, in the opinion of the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship; Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness; or Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • any person who is coming at the invitation of the Minister of Health for the purpose of COVID-19 assistance
  • any person whose purpose is to make medical deliveries of cells, blood, tissues, organs or other body parts for care of a specific patient in Canada, or provide medical services
  • a person who enters Canada to take part in an international single sport event that has been authorized by the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage (a high-performance athlete or someone engaged in an essential role in relation to that event, affiliated with a national organization responsible for that sport), as long as the person complies with any conditions imposed on them to minimize the risk of introduction or spread of COVID-19

Transiting through Canada

You may be permitted to transit through Canada to reach another country.

For more information about flights, see Transit to another country by air.

Canadian waters

You cannot enter Canadian waters for optional reasons. You may still navigate through international and Canadian waters while in transit.

For more information, see Transit through Canadian waters

Provincial and territorial requirements

You may have to comply with additional quarantine requirements, make declarations of your arrival or other restrictions depending on which province or territory is your final destination.

Disclaimer: In addition to the temporary entry restriction in place due to COVID-19, foreign nationals must meet the entry requirements under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and provide appropriate travel and immigration documentation as necessary.

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